Tag: Earned Media


10 Australian Fitness Influencers You Need To Be Following

Today, Australians are without a doubt more conscious of their health and fitness than ever before. Nationally, we spend $8.5 billion each year on gym memberships, sports equipment and the latest fitness trends, highlighting that we’re prepared to pay premium prices to achieve our health and fitness goals.

As we become increasingly active and health focused, as well as more reliant on social media to consume news, be inspired and share our lives, the reach and engagement of fitness influencers has exploded. You might have recently seen that Kayla Itsines and Emily Skye have been included in the 2017 AFR Young Rich List (with a combined wealth of $78 million) emphasising the sheer value of the fitness influencer in today’s society.

In addition to Kayla and Emily, FORWARD has pulled together a list of the 10 Australian Influencers you should be following for your workout fitspo.

  1. Kayla Itsines

@kayla_itsines: 7.8M

At just 26 years old she’s been named the world’s top fitness influencer by Forbes, but Kayla Itsines’ fitness empire has only just begun. Kayla’s fitness journey started back in 2008 when she decided to become a personal trainer and since then she has created a series of ebooks called Bikini Body Guides, a workout and meal-planning app, Sweat with Kayla, and held bootcamps all around the globe. Kayla likes to share transformation images of her BBG girls, nutritious meal inspiration and workout exercises.

Kayla regularly endorses brands such as Adidas, Nike, Apple, Style Runner and Dyson, however she does not do sponsored posts. Kayla has been interviewed for publications including Women’s Health and Fitness, The Daily Telegraph, The Sydney Morning Herald, news.com.au, HuffPost as well as a range of top tier media titles from around the world including The New York Times, Forbes Magazine and Time Magazine.

www.kaylaitsines.com

 

  1. Emily Skye

@emilyskyefit: 2.1M followers

Emily Skye is a health and fitness guru and model, with a passion for getting people moving more, eating healthy foods and appreciating what their body can do. In her quest to show women of all ages and body types how to trim, tone and shape their entire body, Emily has developed a number of fitness products including, F.I.T Programs. These include video libraries of exercises (which can be done in or out of the gym) and nutritionist-developed meal plans. Emily also shares similar content on her social channels encouraging all women to lead active and authentic lives.

Emily is currently a global ambassador for Reebok and Lucozade Sport. She regularly features in publications such as news.com.au, Daily Mail and Women’s Health, sharing her fitness advice and her own body transformations over the years.

www.emilyskye.com 

 

  1. Amanda Bisk

@amandabisk: 680K followers

Amanda Bisk is a former Australian Pole Vaulter who discovered a love for yoga after being diagnosed with chronic fatigue. She found that yoga became an essential part of her life and the key to general wellness. Since then Amanda has become a qualified yoga teacher and has been sharing with her followers all the positive benefits of yoga. If that wasn’t enough, she’s also created a series of online fitness and flexibility programs called Fresh Body Mind Fit. She shares motivating and inspiring images of her healthy lifestyle on her Instagram.

Amanda is the ambassador for H&M Sport, G Active Australia and has recently worked with brands including Qantas and Biotherm, and we were thrilled to work with her for the launch of Purina Beyond in July 2017. Amanda has shared her tips to a balanced and fulfilled life with the likes of WHIMN, Buro 24/7, Sporteluxe and POPSUGAR.

www.amandabisk.com

 

  1. Base Body Babes

@basebodybabes: 654K followers

Base Body Babes was founded by two personal training sisters, Diana Johnson and Felicia Oreb. Their goal? To inspire and motivate women to be as happy healthy, fit, strong and confident as possible. The pair have a passion to educate women on how to work out, eat healthily, get in shape and maintain it for life. In addition to their Instagram they also have their own blog, which they regularly share their fitness advice on.

Base Body Babes are current ambassadors for Bare Blends and have previously worked with brands including Pantene, Swarovski and Natural Raw Company.

www.basebodybabes.com

 

  1. Daniel Conn

@dan_dc_conn: 331K followers

Health and fitness has always been a part of Dan Conn’s life. After an impressive 10-year NRL career playing for the Roosters, Gold Coast Titans and Canterbury Bulldogs, Dan turned to training and nutrition after a neck injury sent him into an early retirement.

This year, Dan became Wellness Director with the Collective Wellness Group (CWG) working closely with Anytime Fitness, Orangetheory Fitness and Massage Envy in developing healthy body and mind programs and contributing to digital content.

Dan has worked with brands such as Mass Nutrition Bondi, AussieBum, Zeal Optics and Lenovo, and is currently an ambassador for Body Science. He has featured in the likes of GQ magazine, Men’s Muscle Health, Body + Soul and 9Coach, sharing his eating habits and workout tips.

http://danielconn.com

 

  1. Michelle Bridges

@mishbridges: 262K

She’s the straight-talking trainer behind Channel Ten’s ‘The Biggest Loser’, but Michelle Bridges has become one of Australia’s most influential personal trainers and fitness influencers. With over 20 year’s experience in personal training, Michelle has published 11 bestselling books and launched the highly successful Michelle Bridges 12 Week Body Transformation online program.

Michelle is the current ambassador for The Australian Institute of Fitness, Medibank and RSPCA QLD, she’s also worked with brands including Big W, Holden and Woolworths. Michelle has recently joined the team at Body + Soul writing a monthly column, and also regularly appears in many other publications such as Prevention, Women’s Health, The Australian Women’s Weekly, Woman’s Day, Good Food and WHO.

www.michellebridges.com.au 

 

  1. Sam Wood

@samjameswood: 238K followers

In 2015, Sam Wood, 34-year-old owner of ‘The Woodshed’, Australia’s largest personal training studio in Brighton, and founder of children’s fitness company Gecko Kids was announced as The Bachelor. He met his partner Snezana Markoski on the show and since then has developed his own lifestyle program, 28 by Sam Wood. The program includes quick, simple, delicious meals with a daily 28-minute exercise program. His aim is to show Aussies that good nutrition & exercise shouldn’t be stressful or complicated.

Sam has recently become the new ambassador for Weet-Bix Blends. Sam has also worked with brands including Asahi, Bakers Delight and Hello Fresh. Sam is a writer for lifestyle.com.au sharing his workout tips and top meals, and has also shared these with publications such as kidspot.com.au, Yahoo7 Be and Mamamia.

28bysamwood.com 

 

 

  1. Tim Robards

@mrtimrobards: 158K followers

Tim Robards became a household name when he starred on The Bachelor in 2013, since then Tim has become known for much more. Tim is a Chiropractor, human biomechanics enthusiast, TV personality/speaker and Inspired Educator in Health & Wellbeing. Tim has also launched his own fitness program, The Robards Method. TRM is about simplifying the approach to optimal health so people can live an inspired, fun and active life. Tim shares workout and fitness tips, as well as recipes with his followers.

Tim is currently an ambassador for Deep Heat (a FORWARD client) Jeep, ALDI, Thermomix and Swisse, and regularly works with fashion brands including MYER, Hugo Boss, Calvin Klein and Calibre. He has previously worked with brands including Fitbit, Giorgio Armani, Westfield and NBN. He also regularly contributes to range of health and fitness publications, including Men’s Health, news.com.au and Yahoo7.

therobardsmethod.com 

 

  1. Andrew Pap

@andrew_pap_: 117K followers

Personal trainer to the stars, Andrew ‘Pap’ Papadopoulos, is a self-confessed fitness junkie and endurance athlete, as well as the owner of Battle Fit Australia. After spending time in the Australian Defence Force, Andrew started Battle Fit Australia – a way to simulate military training, but with his own creative twist.

Andrew is an ambassador for SKINS, Performix, ANKORR & AUSFIT Torsion Bar, and has recently worked with brands such as The Athletes Foot, You Foodz and Isowhey. Andrew is also a contributing writer for GQ magazine and has previously shared his fitness tips with Sporteluxe, Body + Soul and Australian Men’s Health.

www.andrewpap.com.au

 

  1. Dani Stevens

@danistevens365: 117K followers

She’s a stay at home mum with four children and one of the world’s most popular health and wellness motivators, but Dani Stevens shows no signs of slowing down. Dani’s fitness philosophy is that having children or a busy lifestyle, should not require you to sacrifice a healthy existence. Dani is also the author of e-book, ‘30 Days of Fitness & Food’ which includes a range of recipes and workouts designed for the time poor. She also has a successful blog called website Fitness Food and Style. Her blog and social channels feature weekly motivating weight-loss success stories, monthly challenges to keep followers motivated and regular recipes and activities to keep followers consistently checking in.

Dani is currently an ambassador for American Express and has previously collaborated with Jamie Oliver, Volvo, Telstra Dr Oz, FORWARD worked with Dani for Thermos.

www.danistevens.com

With Australians becoming more health conscious, health, nutrition and fitness brands will continue to grow and need to develop strategies to obtain and retain market share. The importance of being able to identify current, as well as up and coming, influencers that align with particular brand values, campaigns and messaging is more important than ever.

If you would like to know more about how your brand can benefit from working with influencers like these, please get in touch with the FORWARD team.

 

TrueLocal appoints FORWARD Agency to manage PR & Influence

FORWARD Agency today announced its appointment as public relations and influence agency partner for TrueLocal, following a competitive pitch.

The appointment will see FORWARD help TrueLocal build its brand profile and educate Australian small business and consumers about the benefits of using Australia’s largest online local directory.

Ruth Trewhella, TrueLocal Group Manager, said: “The FORWARD team impressed us with their strategic understanding of our category and innovative ideas to help us build relevant and engaging content. We were looking for a partner with solid traditional and digital public relations expertise as well as experience in working with influencers.”

Fergus Kibble, FORWARD Agency Founder and Managing Director said: “We are looking forward to working with TrueLocal and the extended Sensis team to help educate and inspire both businesses and consumers on how they can get more out of TrueLocal. The directories landscape is constantly changing, especially given the rise and rise of mobile apps, so we are pleased to be working with one of the lead innovators.”

Truelocal APP

 

 

4 minutes with: Sean Pickwell, Director – Waterfront

A celebrity partnership could  help your brand to drive fast awareness, engagement and fan love;  and not to mention media interest. The right famous face paired with the right brand can sometimes be a match made in heaven, but finding that perfect fit might not be as easy as you think.  

We spent 4 minutes with Sean Pickwell, Managing Director of Australia’s number one international celebrity sourcing agency, Waterfront to get some expert advice on celebrity partnerships.

In your opinion, what are some of the most successful brand and celebrity partnerships of the last 12 months, and why?

There are so many… but a few favourites over the last year for me are:

Mila Kunis – Jim Beam – I love it because it’s unexpected and cuts through. She makes me want to start drinking Beam. Likewise, Anna Kendrick’s anti-ads for Newcastle Ale are so clever. Using female celebrities for male-skewed drinks cuts though, but the execution like in these two cases needs to be great.

Globally I love the use of celebrities in the Snickers campaigns from Betty White to Mr Bean, and even our own Ray Meagher (Alf from Home and Away).

Jacobs Creek does a great job with their tennis stars and the amount of great content they develop – first was Andre Agassi then Novak Djokovic this year.

Some good Aussie celebrity campaigns – Barry Hall/Kleenex – nice connection to the soft side he showed on I’m A Celebrity, Julia Morris and Westinghouse – not an obvious fit, but the execution is great, and she is so loved, and self-deprecating that it makes the brand shine.

While they do cancel themselves out a bit, both Curtis Stone and Jamie Oliver’s ongoing campaigns for Coles/Woolies, are strong, clear branding efforts. Both have outstanding brand values that each of the supermarkets desperately wants, and both speak to middle Australia. And to some degree they are both working.

What are the top 3 things a brand should know before starting the search for a celebrity ambassador?

The key things are what you are trying to achieve with the celebrity partnership, what are the brand values you want them to represent, and what do you need them to do. Sounds fairly straightforward but it is amazing how often these basics get skipped.

Understanding your brand is really important, and what you want to say in the market. Celebrities and the message they convey vary so much.

Also, you need to know that you will be dealing with someone (and their team) who has opinions, and will often have input – they aren’t machines. So it can be a hot kitchen…and you need to understand it can be a wild ride. But that’s why we use celebrities – to harness that personality and power for your brand. But it’s not always easy.

What should a brand look for when searching for a celebrity?

Fit is the key – their brand values and yours – making sure they are aligned.

Although often the celebrities brand values may be where you want your brand to end up, rather than where it is now. In many cases, the reason you might look to a particular celebrity is where the celebrity can take your brand.

Ideally you want someone who you can work with, and who wants to work with you. This is not always easy to know upfront, but there are ways to see if you will be compatible.

What are the most important rules of engagement when working with a celebrity?

Be upfront in the negotiating about what you are trying to do, and what you want from them – specifically.

Try and build a strong relationship with them and the team, so when you do maybe need something extra, it won’t be a problem. And they will want to go the extra mile for you.

Don’t skimp on extra things like accommodation, transport, meals, etc. just to save a few bucks. If they feel you are being cheap, it can rub off on their attitude.

Don’t try and sneak things in once the deal is done. One company we know added extra category exclusions into the contract right at the last minute. Got everyone off side.

What are the most common things a brand can forget when working with a celebrity?

It’s not so much what you might forget; it’s more know what to remember. That’s not just being tricky with words, more to make the point that when you do something everyday, you get good at it, and you know what to look for in each situation. It’s really a great argument to use a specialist to help secure your celebrity. We know who to talk to, how much you should be paying, what you need to include and remember, and how to make it as smooth as possible.

Sean Pickwell(lowres)

The Future of PR: 3 Major Insights from the PRIA’s Vivid Ideas Session

Today, the Public Relations Institute of Australia (PRIA) held an event as part of the Vivid Sydney called Creativity, Content and the Future of PR. Hosted by industry virtuoso Amanda Little, the program featured four participants:

  • Adam Good – Director of Digital Media & Content at Telstra
  • Glen Cassidy – Founding Partner at Cake Wines
  • Shane Currey – Director – Design Thinking | Visualisation | Storytelling – Deloitte Australia
  • Lex Deasley – Creative & Strategy Director at Hausmann Communications

The event was a complete sell-out indicating just how important the topic of industry transformation is for comms professionals today. The future role of PR in integrated story telling, consumer engagement and brand building were hot topics.

There were three major “a-ha moments” at the session that I believe are worth sharing.

PRIA_VividIdeas-40

  1. Customer experience should be at the heart of big ideas

According to keynote speaker, Adam Good from Telstra, the best way to influence people is to focus on the customer experience, ensuring a company’s products and services deliver on brand promises.

Adam also talked about the important role PR plays at Telstra, which includes focusing multiple disciplines, combing creativity / content to create action-centric communication.

In the development of any Telstra comms campaign, big idea or consumer engagement piece, Adam relayed three important factors that Telstra considers:

Mechanics – What is at the heart of the idea or proposition? Are you nourishing the idea and proposition around the experience? How do you tell the story in different channels? Ultimately, “Why do I care about this idea”? You need to answer the most important meta-question: “What is in it for the customer”?

Dynamics – What behaviour are you looking for from the consumer? What do you want the consumer to do with the idea? What are they going to put into it and what are they going to take out of it? Do you want them to have involvement for an immediate, once-off action, or over time?

Aesthetics – What is the direct emotional response that you want the consumer to have when they interact? This is more than the look and feel – it is the emotional feeling that you want to create from that individual.

PRIA_VividIdeas-171

  1. Reciprocity in value exchange

Shane Currey from Deloitte made an important and provocative point: brands should give in the expectation of not getting anything back.

However Hausmann’s Creative & Strategy Director Lex Deasley challenged this, commenting that lots of brands are creating content to access audiences. Yet many brands don’t understand one basic truth: they need to have a purpose and a role in the experience or relationship that is being created, or there is no legitimate value exchange.

To create a value exchange the brand needs to ask the question “does this make people’s lives better?”.

Public Relations role argued Deasley, is to help clients understand reciprocity in value exchange.

PRIA_VividIdeas-192

  1. Build platforms not campaigns

Glen Cassidy, Founding Partner at Cake Wines, shared the terrific case study of his business which, although only a few years old, has already carved out a unique and strong market position.

Cake Wines has achieved this by focusing on celebrating sub-culture and not through mass marketing. For example, they donate 10% of proceeds to independent radio stations around the country, and commission emerging artists to create their labels via their prestigious annual Archi-bottle art competition. See the case study here.

Cassidy demonstrated that consumers who have deep levels of involvement in the communications from the brand ultimately foster a deeper brand connection. He says: “We push our ideas and try to push our creative thinking as far as we can so that people have a deep experience with our ideas and campaigns – our internal mantra is ‘to focus on building platforms, not campaigns’ and connect people and bring them together in a meaningful way that extends beyond the budget or period of time.”

The key take out: We should be thinking more broadly about ideas that last longer.

The session was inspiring, providing food for thought and grist for the mental mill. The final word came from Adam Good: “It is the most exciting time to work in the communications industry”. Hear! Hear!

Thanks to the PRIA for organising the event and Amanda Little for hosting.

PRIA_VividIdeas-197

4 minutes with: Zoe Bingley-Pullin

Brand ambassadors can be a powerful way to support PR and influence campaigns. They provide expert voices to tell brands’ stories and can help establish a brand’s credibility and authenticity with the media, bloggers and other influencers.

We love to showcase the people we work with and for this month’s ‘4 minutes with’ we chatted with a brand ambassador we work with: nutritionist, chef, co-star of Good Chef Bad Chef and Vitasoy ambassador, Zoe Bingley-Pullin.

What do you love about your job?

I think of what I do as an evolution. I wasn’t very good at school when I was younger – I’m dyslexic and this affected my confidence. I had no idea what I wanted to do when I finished, but I’d always loved food so I went and studied at Le Cordon Bleu in London. I then combined this with a Diploma of Nutrition.

Nutrition and the socialisation of food is something I’ve found really freeing and fun. Being able to help people improve their knowledge and relationship with food makes me feel good and I love creating healthy dishes for others and myself and get such a kick out of seeing everyone enjoy it.

How has PR and media played a role in your career?

PR and media have been integral to my career and my work as a nutritionist, chef and brand ambassador. For me, food is all about enjoyment and I want to help people find joy in food through educating them on healthy choices, and PR and media have helped me get this message out there. Specifically I’ve worked closely with brands and PR teams through my role as a brand ambassador, where I raised awareness about nutritious eating.

What’s the most valuable career lesson you’ve learnt?

The most valuable career lesson I’ve learnt is to always say when you can’t do something. And if you realise you can’t do something, don’t pretend that you can. If you’re unable to deliver on something, it could have a negative impact on your business or brand.

I’ve also learnt the benefits of partnering with experts myself. There’s a wealth of talent out there than can help you, which has been especially important since becoming a mother. I’m trying to expand my business and I’m now working with a business coach to do this.

How do you choose which brands to work with?

I’m very strict about the brands I work with. I only work with brands that I love and that I’d give to my whole family. I also look to work with brands that are aligned with my views on nutrition and wholefoods, so that we can work together to build Australians’ knowledge on nutrition and healthy eating.

And a final question we’re all dying to know from a foodie – what’s been your most memorable meal?

One of my most memorable meals was in Rome with my husband, at a restaurant called Maccheroni. The dish was a simple pasta dish with olive oil, sea salt, chili and black truffle. I’m not talking about a little truffle either – there was so much truffle on there! I had it with a crisp green salad and a glass of rosé. It was a beautiful time and just showed that food doesn’t have to be overcomplicated.

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NOTE: FORWARD has been working with nutritionist, chef and co-star of Good Chef Bad Chef, Zoe Bingley-Pullin for the past year as an expert for Vitasoy.